skip to Main Content

Ocean Pollution: a Cruise Ship Pollute as Much as 13 Million Cars—in One Day

Watch a Cruise Ship Pollute as Much as 13 Million Cars—in One Day

Watch a Cruise Ship Pollute as Much as 13 Million Cars—in One Day
Cruise ship pollution in the United States
Watch a Cruise Ship Pollute as Much as 13 Million Cars
Cruise ships – Friends of the Earth
Cruise Ship Pollute

pollution caused by cruise ships

cruise line pollution

This year, the cruise industry is expecting a record 23 million passengers to hit the high seas—meaning the hidden environmental costs aren’t going away anytime soon.

Cruise ships have been described as “floating cities” and like cities, they have a lot of pollution problems. Their per capita pollution is actually worse than a city of the same population, due to weak pollution control laws, lax enforcement, and the difficulty of detecting illegal discharges at sea. Cruise ships impact coastal waters in several US states, including Alaska, California, Florida, and Hawaii.

All cruise ships generate the following types of waste:

“Gray water” from sinks, showers, laundries and galleys
Sewage or “black water” from toilets
Oily bilge water
Hazardous wastes (including perchloroethylene from drycleaning, photo-processing wastes, paint waste, solvents, print shop wastes, fluorescent light bulbs, and batteries)
Solid wastes (plastic, paper, wood, cardboard, food waste, cans, and glass)
Air pollution from the ship’s diesel engines

Back To Top